Chigwell & Hainault Synagogue, Limes Avenue, Chigwell. IG7 5NT

020 8500 2451

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© Chigwell & Hainault Synagogue 2018. All rights reserved. 

Website by Hannah Frankel

Bar/Bat Mitzvah

Mazal Tov on Bar/Bat Mitzvah

here is all the information you need 

Chigwell & Hainault Synagogue together with Yad Vashem UK would like to offer you a unique opportunity of twinning your Simcha with a child of the Holocaust.

Bar Mitzvah

At the age of thirteen, a Jewish boy becomes a ‘Bar Mitzvah’ which means ‘son of the commandments’.  At this age, in Jewish terms, boys become adults in respect of being obligated to live a Jewish life and thereby accept an additional set of responsibilities.  This is why it is traditional to celebrate this milestone by a boy participating in a service in a way which reflects this new stage in his life.

 

Your rabbi will work together with you to help plan a Bar Mitzvah. We have set out some general information below as to how the process may proceed.

On the day of his thirteenth birthday (in the Hebrew calendar), the Bar Mitzvah should go to shul that morning, along with his family, to wear his tefillin for the first time as an adult, rather than the time he has spent learning how to wear them.

 

If this occurs on either a Monday or Thursday, or another time when the Torah is read, the Bar Mitzvah will receive a call-up (aliyah) to the Torah. He may also choose to read from the Torah.

 

After the Bar Mitzvah completes his aliyah, his father recites a special blessing of thanks for his son making it to adulthood.  This blessing is at the top of page 126 in the green edition of the Singer’s Siddur.

 

On the Shabbat of the main Bar Mitzvah ceremony, the boy will receive a call up to the Torah and often read a portion, if not all, of the Sedra (the Torah reading for that week from the Pentateuch) and the Maftir (an extra piece following the Sedra), as well as the Haftarah (a reading from the Prophets, a later part of the Hebrew Bible, connected to a theme in the Sedra).  Your rabbi and barmitzvah teacher will advise how much the Bar Mitzvah should read and how the service will proceed on that particular Shabbat.

As befits this rite of passage, it is traditional to have a festive meal to celebrate a barmitzvah.  This could range from a special Kiddush, to a meal at home or shul on Shabbat, or another form of party.

Click here to see the current London Beth Din licensed caterers

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Bat Mitzvah

A girl becomes ‘Bat Mitzvah’ (‘a daughter of the commandements’) when she reaches her 12th hebrew birthday. In terms of Jewish law, girls become adults at this age in respect of being obligated to live a Jewish life and thereby accept an additional set of responsibilities.   

In US communities, girls can chose either to have a batmitzvah in the synagogue, at home or elsewhere, or to be part of Bat Chayil ceremony with other girls. A Bat Mitzvah ceremony is the most common of these and general information about this is set out below. To plan your own ceremony, please speak to your rabbi.

Girls prepare for their Bat Mitzvah by studying about some of the obligations they will take on once they reach twelve, such as Shabbat, Kashrut (laws of kosher food) and laws about showing kindness to others.

 

To celebrate this next stage of her life, it is customary for a girl to research and prepare a ‘Devar Torah’, a short speech in which she presents ideas about Jewish life and study.  This is a gateway to the advanced Jewish studies options now available to her and the opportunities she has to be involved in Jewish experiences and social networks after her Bat Mitzvah.

You may wish to have a festive meal to celebrate a batmitzvah.  This could range from a special Kiddush, to a meal at home or shul on Shabbat, or another form of party.

Click here to see the current London Beth Din licensed caterers

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Twinning Project

Yad Vashem UK foundation

 

Make your Bar Mitzvah and Bat Mitzvah more meaningful by twinning it with a young victim of the holocaust who tragically was unable to celebrate this milestone in jewish life.

Yad Vashem UK Foundation offers a Bar Mitzvah and Bat Mitzvah Twinning programme to enrich your child's coming of age experience by memorialising a victim of the holocaust who did not have the privilege of such a celebration.

Researchers at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem will endeavour to find a name which your child could most relate to, perhaps with the same name or birthday as the child celebrating or someone who came from the same town or area where their family originated.

Family members are encouraged to use the Page of Testimony to learn as much as they can about the history of the child who they are commemorating. To facilitate this we send a study guide together with the Page of Testimony and certificate detailing a list of resources on various websites and book easily found in most libraries.

Following on from a very successful Bar/Bat Mitzvah Twinning project we would like to invite anyone who will be celebrating their 2nd Barmitzvah to participate in this wonderful project to remember and keep alive the memory of a child of the Holocaust who didn’t get the opportunity of such a Mitzvah.

For more information please contact Harvey Frankel on 07956278246 or email harveyfrankel@hotmail.com.